Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

John Harvard's Journal

Yesterday’s News

September-October 2017

Illustration by Mark Steele


Illustration by Mark Steele

1922

“The Reds in America,” an article published in the Boston Transcript, charges that the University is a “hot-bed” of radicalism, that “no institution of learning in the country has been so thoroughly saturated with the ‘liberal’ activity as Harvard,” and intimates that members of the faculty “are not all unswervingly faithful to the status quo….”

1937

Through its employment agency, the College dean’s office has helped more than 200 part-time-job applicants, recruiting “for every sort of position from chauffeur to chess teacher,” including, it’s said, a student who can teach “jiu-jitsu.”

Prompted by President Conant’s suggestion that every college graduate should have a knowledge of the cultural history of the country in the broadest sense of the term, enabling them to face the future “united and unafraid,” a voluntary examination in American history for all undergraduates who haven’t taken a course in that field will be held on November 15.

1947

The New York Times reports that the basic cost of a Harvard education has risen only 3 percent above the pre-war cost, versus 39 percent for other private colleges and 47 percent for public colleges.

1952

Eight Allston Burr senior tutors have been appointed as part of a new effort to enlarge the Houses’ role in undergraduate life through the establishment of intra-House group-tutorial systems.

1972

The new Harvard Center for Research in Children’s Television, funded by the Markle Foundation with administrative support from the University and Children’s Television Workshop, will explore the effects of visual media on children.

1982

Sharon Beckman ’80, her late-August attempt partly supported by a $1,000 grant from Radcliffe College, becomes the first New England woman to swim the English Channel (covering almost 21 miles in nine hours and six minutes). She celebrates that victory two weeks later by winning the 10-mile Boston Light swim in Boston Harbor.

1997

In accord with Harvard’s non-discrimination policy, Memorial Church begins holding same-sex commitment ceremonies.

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Memorial Hall burning in September 1956—with flames beyond the reach of firefighting apparatus

Photograph by William Simon

Harvard satirized, critiqued, aflame

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You Might Also Like:

The front of the sleeve from a Dunster Dunces album, which included arrangements of George Gershwin and Irving Berlin, as well as original compositions

Courtesy of Jonathan Aibel

The sounds of one of Harvard's earliest a cappella groups, the Dunster Dunces

Memorial Hall burning in September 1956—with flames beyond the reach of firefighting apparatus

Photograph by William Simon

Harvard satirized, critiqued, aflame

Illustration by Mark Steele

Headlines from Harvard’s history