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Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Harvard Squared

Spotlight

November-December 2014

On any Sunday morning, churchgoers can hear splendid gospel music in Greater Boston. Only this December at the Museum of Fine Arts can anyone tune into the select power of The NEC Millennium Gospel Choir, which features about 100 dedicated local singers chosen for their dynamic ranges and techniques. “It’s a multiethnic, multidenominational choir that embodies the whole mission behind the Gospel, as well as gospel music,” says choir co-director Herbert Jones. “That is, being a unifier of people and providing a place where everyone can come together and not let their differences be an issue.” The choir was formed through the New England Conservatory’s Community Collaborations Program in 2000, and has given sporadic concerts ever since. Jones says a mix of works is on the MFA program, such as the modern world classic “Total Praise” by Grammy-winning gospel artist Richard Smallwood. The song’s beautifully harmonized chorus is a simple act of devotion: “You are the source of my strength/You are the strength of my life/I lift my hands in total praise to You.”

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
http://www.mfa.org/programs/music
December 19 and 20

Harvard Squared

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