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Features | Harvard @375

The Progress of the Disciplines

Leading professors on the future of their fields

September-October 2011

Pamela Silver

Pamela Silver

Photograph by Jim Harrison

Sidebars:

Pamela Silver

An ancient science becomes the new technology.

Preparation for international practice

Helen Vendler

How to preserve the humanities

Cherry A. Murray

A question of convergence

Edward L. Glaeser

Better data, the rise of real experiments, and interdisciplinary advances in the social sciences

Sidebars:

Pamela Silver

An ancient science becomes the new technology.

Preparation for international practice

Helen Vendler

How to preserve the humanities

Cherry A. Murray

A question of convergence

Edward L. Glaeser

Better data, the rise of real experiments, and interdisciplinary advances in the social sciences

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A network of curli fibers (produced by genetically altered E. coli bacteria) can bind to intestinal surfaces, where it acts like a Band-Aid, and can even deliver probiotic therapies.

A network of curli fibers (produced by genetically altered E. coli bacteria) can bind to intestinal surfaces, where it acts like a Band-Aid, and can even deliver probiotic therapies.
Image courtesy of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Toward a biomanufacturing future

Super-resolution microscopy developed in the lab of Peng Yin allows researchers using conventional microscopes to see the inner workings of cells at the single molecule level. Above, microtubules (green) and mitochondria (purple) dominate the intracellular landscape.

Super-resolution microscopy developed in the lab of Peng Yin allows researchers using conventional microscopes to see the inner workings of cells at the single molecule level. Above, microtubules (green) and mitochondria (purple) dominate the intracellular landscape.
Image courtesy of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Building a Better Microscope

You Might Also Like:

A network of curli fibers (produced by genetically altered E. coli bacteria) can bind to intestinal surfaces, where it acts like a Band-Aid, and can even deliver probiotic therapies.

A network of curli fibers (produced by genetically altered E. coli bacteria) can bind to intestinal surfaces, where it acts like a Band-Aid, and can even deliver probiotic therapies.
Image courtesy of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Toward a biomanufacturing future

Super-resolution microscopy developed in the lab of Peng Yin allows researchers using conventional microscopes to see the inner workings of cells at the single molecule level. Above, microtubules (green) and mitochondria (purple) dominate the intracellular landscape.

Super-resolution microscopy developed in the lab of Peng Yin allows researchers using conventional microscopes to see the inner workings of cells at the single molecule level. Above, microtubules (green) and mitochondria (purple) dominate the intracellular landscape.
Image courtesy of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Building a Better Microscope