Broken Baseball Bats: A Harvard (Statistician's) View

Major League Baseball has retained Carl Morris, professor of statistics and professor of health care policy, to assist in its analysis of the seeming upsurge in broken baseball bats this season...

The New York Times reports that Major League Baseball has retained Carl Morris, professor of statistics and professor of health care policy, to assist in its analysis of the seeming upsurge in broken baseball bats this season—variously attributed to the shift from ash to maple, improper curing of the wood, inferior wood, or players' habit of shaving their bat handles to a dangerous degree. Whatever the reason, the risk of being struck or impaled by a flying fragment of a shattered bat poses a real, frightening threat to players and fans alike. In a 2002 article for Harvard Magazine, writer Alan Schwarz probed Morris's professional interest in baseball, noting: "It's hard to imagine Morris getting more worked up over universal healthcare than he does when his beloved Red Sox squelch a rally with a misguided attempt to steal second base."

You might also like

Threats Foreign and Domestic

Joseph Nye discusses geopolitics and Harvard’s challenges.

Harvard’s New Football Coach: A Real Tiger

The magazine’s football correspondent advises fans to deal with it.

The Interim President’s Agenda

Alan Garber on campus speech, academics, and his other Harvard priorities

Most popular

Reviving Neglected Space

Practicing architecture in Myanmar

Painter, Anew

Nell Painter reflects on leaving the ivory tower for art school at age 64.

"A Force on the Ice"

There has been a Moore on the ice for Harvard since 1996, when Mark Moore '00 matriculated. His brothers, Steve '01 and Dominic '03, followed...

More to explore

Photograph of Winthrop Bell 1910

Winthrop Bell

Brief life of a philosopher and spy: 1884-1965

Illustration of people talking to each other with colorful thought bubbles above their heads

Talking about Talking

Fostering healthy disagreement

Vacationing with a Purpose

New England “summer camps” for adults