Harvard Arts and Sciences Centennial Medalists

For graduate studies that contributed to society

Head shots of the four Centennial Medalists: Lotte Bailyn, John Hutchinson, Marvin Kalb, and Margaret McIntosh
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences honorands, clockwise from top left: Lotte Bailyn, John Hutchinson, Marvin Kalb, and Margaret McIntoshCourtesy of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences’ Centennial Medal, first awarded in 1989 on the occasion of the school’s hundredth anniversary, honors alumni who have made contributions to society that emerged from their graduate studies. It is the highest honor GSAS bestows, and awardees include some of Harvard’s most accomplished alumni. The 2021 recipients, announced on May 26, are: Lotte Bailyn, A.M. ’53, Ph.D. ’56, a social psychologist who studies organizational behavior; John Hutchinson, S.M. ’61, Ph.D. ’63, a mechanical engineer; Marvin Kalb, A.M. ’53, a journalist; and Margaret “Peggy” McIntosh ’56, A.M. ’61, Ph.D. ’67, an advocate for social and educational equity and diversity. 

Published in the print edition of the July-August 2021 issue (Volume 123, Number 6), under the headline “Centennial Medalists.”

You might also like

Teaching Nutrition in Medical Education

Will Harvard Medical School return nutrition instruction to pre-eminence?

Animal (Code) Cracker

After listening to leviathans, an undergraduate comes to conservation.  

Breaking Bread

Alexander Heffner ’12 plumbs the state of democracy.

Most popular

Prepare for AI Hackers

Human systems of all kinds may soon be vulnerable to subversion by artificial intelligence.

Teaching Nutrition in Medical Education

Will Harvard Medical School return nutrition instruction to pre-eminence?

The Missing Middle

How overheated political attention warps campus life

More to explore

Architect Kimberly Dowdell is Changing Her Profession

Kimberly Dowdell influences her profession—and the built environment.

How Schizophrenia Resembles the Aging Brain

The search for schizophrenia’s biological basis reveals an unexpected link to cellular changes seen in aging brains.

Harvard Researchers on Speaking to Whales

Project CETI’s pioneering effort to unlock the language of sperm whales