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Articles: Research

A patient undergoes acupuncture of the belly

Photograph by Morofoto/iStock

Research

“Fine-tuning” an ancient practice to heal, not harm

12.7.20

Headshots of Marc Lipsitch, William Hanage, Barry Bloom

From left to right: Marc Lipsitch, William Hanage, Barry Bloom

Photograph credits from left: Kent Dayton and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (2)

Despite vaccines, Harvard scientists warn, more-transmissible variants make COVID-19 harder to control.

1.7.21

 

Image by Unsplash. 

Amid skirmishing on the stimulus bill, another chance for wider viral detection 

12.7.20

A photograph of art historian Cassandra Albinson next to a photograph of a portrait of the Marquise de Pompadour applying pink rouge to her cheeks

Cassandra Albinson

Photograph by Stu Rosner; Painting: Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, Marquise de Pompadour (1750) by François Boucher/Courtesy of the Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Bequest of Charles E. Dunlap

A curator takes a fresh look at portraits of aristocratic European women.

January-February 2021

An aerial view (taken by a drone) of the south side of Harvard’s new science and engineering complex, in a perspective looking northwest toward the stadium

Click on arrow at right to view additional images
(1 of 10) The south side of Harvard’s new science and engineering complex, in a perspective looking northwest toward the stadium

Photograph by Steve Dunwell

A new center for engineering and applied sciences—finally

January-February 2021

A patient undergoes acupuncture of the belly

Photograph by Morofoto/iStock

“Fine-tuning” an ancient practice to heal, not harm

January-February 2021

Cracks appear in a balloon decorated like a $100 bill as Uncle Sam fills it with a bicycle pump

Illustration by Dave Cutler

Contrary to expert belief, some financial crises can be predicted—and perhaps averted.

January-February 2021

Image shows a dendritic cell (shown in yellow) attached to a man-made polymer lattice inside a pill-sized implantable device.

Dendritic cells (like the one shown in yellow, within a pink polymer support structure) can be activated to recognize cancer cells. After migrating to the lymph nodes and spleen, they then train immune-system T cells to attack and destroy tumors.

Image courtesy of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University

An implantable cancer vaccine shows promise in training the immune system to attack tumors.

January-February 2021

Photograph of Harvard president Lawrence S. Bacow

Lawrence S. Bacow

As SEAS moves to Allston, President Bacow highlights the University’s newest innovation hub.

January-February 2021