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Articles: Research

A coal burning power plant in Scottsdale, Arizona

Fine particle pollution, like that generated by coal-burning power plants, has been linked to increases in neurological disease.

Photograph by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Research

Hospitalizations for neurological disease rise with increases in fine particle pollution.

10.19.20

Black-and-white photograph of Karl Puchner in 1937 with his wife, young son, and a tiny, barely visible swastika button on his jacket

In a June 1937 photo, Karl Puchner posed with his wife and son Günter—and a tiny swastika button, which his younger son discovered years later by using a magnifying glass.

Photograph courtesy of Martin Puchner

A German American scholar is unsettled by an ancestor’s secret.

November-December 2020

An illustration of social capital, the subject of the book being reviewed, in the form of an individual versus a group working together

Illustration by Kotryna Zukauskaite

In search of optimism, a sweeping interpretation of American social history

November-December 2020

Image of Harvard University seal

Recognized for developing genome-editing technique

10.7.20

photograph of two election mail envelopes with face masks

Election mail envelopes with face masks

Photograph by Tiffany Tertipes/via Unsplash

A White House-led effort to recast public discourse 

10.6.20

Red graphic which reads At Home with Harvard: Sounds of Music

  

A selection of our stories on musicians, composers, conductors, music scholars, and more 

10.2.20

Headshot portraits of: Roberto Gonzales, Peggy Koenig, Michelle Rodriguez, Julio Reyes Copello, Sergio Trujillo

Clockwise from top left: Roberto Gonzales, Peggy Koenig, Michelle Rodriguez, Julio Reyes Copello, Sergio Trujillo
Image collage by Niko Yaitanes/Harvard Magazine

Sociologist Roberto Gonzales’s research is becoming a musical.

10.1.20

According to the data set assembled by Harvard Law School scholars, black and Latinx people are overrepresented in Massachusetts criminal caseload compared to their population in the state. White people make up 74.3 percent of the state’s population and are defendants in in 58.7 percent of cases. Black people make up 6.5 percent of the population and are defendants in 17.1 percent of cases. Latinx people make up 8.7 percent of the population, and are defendants in in 18.3 percent of cases. Click on image to view full graphic

Source: Massachusetts Racial Disparity Report

Harvard Law School researchers identify the mechanisms that lead to longer sentences for nonwhite defendants.

9.9.20

Michael Kremer

Michael Kremer
Photograph courtesy Michael Kremer/Harvard University

Development economist pulls up roots.

8.24.20