Congress's First Blind Rabbi?

Last week's New Yorker had a Talk of the Town piece on the man who hopes to be the first blind rabbi—and in fact, the first rabbi—to serve in the U.S. Congress...

Last week's New Yorker had a Talk of the Town piece on the man who hopes to be the first blind rabbi—and in fact, the first rabbi—to serve in the U.S. Congress.

Dennis Shulman also holds a Harvard Ph.D.—he earned a doctorate in psychology in 1976.

He is trying to unseat incumbent Representative Scott Garrett, a Republican who, according to author Jeffrey Toobin ’82, J.D. ’86, has "the most conservative voting record of any member of the House from the Northeast." In June, Shulman bested opponents Camille Abate and Roger Bacon to win the Democratic primary for the seat, which covers northeastern New Jersey near the Pennsylvania border. 

Toobin's short piece packs in a wealth of biographical information and a few humorous moments. For instance, he quotes Shulman as saying:

"My favorite headline from the primary was 'blind rabbi's opponent is bacon.’”

You might also like

Threats Foreign and Domestic

Joseph Nye discusses geopolitics and Harvard’s challenges.

Harvard’s New Football Coach: A Real Tiger

The magazine’s football correspondent advises fans to deal with it.

The Interim President’s Agenda

Alan Garber on campus speech, academics, and his other Harvard priorities

Most popular

Open Book: The Photographer’s Art

Robin Kelsey probes the place of photography within art.

An Ipswich Idyll

Restorations revive the grand spirit of a North Shore estate.

Harvard Corporation to Drop Law School Shield Linked to Slavery

The announcement follows a Law School committee’s recommendation to abandon the shield. 

More to explore

Photograph of Winthrop Bell 1910

Winthrop Bell

Brief life of a philosopher and spy: 1884-1965

Illustration of people talking to each other with colorful thought bubbles above their heads

Talking about Talking

Fostering healthy disagreement

Vacationing with a Purpose

New England “summer camps” for adults