Sports Roundup

Men’s Soccer

The Crimson (12-6-0, 5-2 Ivy), undefeated at home, just missed capturing the Ivy title. In post-season NCAA play the thirtieth-ranked booters fell in the second round to the University of South Florida, number eight. Four players made the first all-Ivy team, including junior Andre Akpan, who has now surpassed Chris Ohiri ’64 as the Crimson’s all-time leading scorer.

Women’s Soccer

The women booters (10-3-5, 5-1-1 Ivy) won the Ivy League championship by beating Columbia 2-1 on a penalty kick with nine seconds left in double overtime before falling in the opening round of post-season NCAA play. Freshman Melanie Baskind was named Ivy League rookie of the year. 

Men’s Basketball

After a 3-11 season last year, the netmen (3-2, 0-0 Ivy) were picked to finish fourth in the Ivies this year, thanks to an expected boost from a strong recruiting class. But in early November, freshman star Andrew Van Nest suffered a season-ending shoulder injury that may hurt the hoopsters’ chances in Ivy play.

Women’s Basketball

After winning a piece of the Ivy title two years in a row, the netwomen (4-2, 0-0 Ivy) hope to repeat in 2009. With its strong roster of returning players, Harvard was again a preseason favorite.

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