New Fellows

From left: Katherine Xue and Isabel Ruane

Harvard Magazine’s Berta Greenwald Ledecky Undergraduate Fellows for the 2011-2012 academic year will be Isabel Ruane ’14 and Katherine Xue ’13. They were selected after an evaluation of writing submitted by nearly two dozen student applicants for the two positions. The fellows, who join the editorial staff during the year, contribute to the magazine as “Undergraduate” columnists and initiate story ideas, write news and feature items for print publication and harvardmagazine.com, and edit copy. Ruane, of Wilton, Connecticut, and Mather House, was a member of the women’s sailing team that finished seventh in the national championships this past May in Cascade Locks, Oregon. She is interested in pursuing a concentration in history and literature or history. She served as a counselor at Camp Onaway on Newfound Lake in New Hampshire during the summer. Xue, of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Quincy House, is concentrating in chemical and physical biology. During the past summer, she taught English and other subjects in Namibia, under the auspices of WorldTeach. She is a member of the Harvard Ballroom Dance Team and has written and edited for several campus publications. The fellowships are supported by Jonathan J. Ledecky ’79, M.B.A. ’83, and named in honor of his mother.

You might also like

Teaching Nutrition in Medical Education

Will Harvard Medical School return nutrition instruction to pre-eminence?

Animal (Code) Cracker

After listening to leviathans, an undergraduate comes to conservation.  

Breaking Bread

Alexander Heffner ’12 plumbs the state of democracy.

Most popular

Prepare for AI Hackers

Human systems of all kinds may soon be vulnerable to subversion by artificial intelligence.

Teaching Nutrition in Medical Education

Will Harvard Medical School return nutrition instruction to pre-eminence?

The Missing Middle

How overheated political attention warps campus life

More to explore

Architect Kimberly Dowdell is Changing Her Profession

Kimberly Dowdell influences her profession—and the built environment.

How Schizophrenia Resembles the Aging Brain

The search for schizophrenia’s biological basis reveals an unexpected link to cellular changes seen in aging brains.

Harvard Researchers on Speaking to Whales

Project CETI’s pioneering effort to unlock the language of sperm whales