At the Forefront

Frances Pass Addelson and Philip Keene
Photograph by Jane Reed

The oldest graduates of Harvard and Radcliffe present on Commencement day, who led the alumni parade into Tercentenary Theatre before the HAA's annual meeting, were 101-year-old Philip Keene '25, S.M. '40, of Middletown, Connecticut, who was making his third appearance at the head of the line, and 95-year-old Frances Pass Addelson '30, of Brookline, Massachusetts. According to University records, the oldest alumni, apart from Keene, include: James G. Jameson '22, 104, of Orlando, Florida; Charles H. Warner '21, 104, of Berkeley, California; Albert H. Gordon '23, M.B.A. '25, LL.D. '77, 102, of New York City; Marion Coppelman Epstein '24, 101, of Boston; M. Louise Macnair '25, 101, of Cambridge; Eliot K. Bartholomew '25, 101, of Monarch Beach, California; Halford J. Pope '25, 100, of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina; A. Suzanne (Fawcett) Snow '25, 100, of Silvis, Illinois; and Hugh Langdon Elsbree '23, 100, of Saint Joseph, Missouri. Outstripping them all is Walter H. Seward, J.D. '24, of West Orange, New Jersey. Born on October 13, 1896, he is 107 years old.

     

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