Harvard College Term Bill Increases 3.5 Percent

Financial-aid budget rises 5.8 percent, to $182 million

Harvard College announced today that the term bill (tuition, room and board, and fees) for 2013-2014 will be $56,407—3.5 percent ($1,911) higher than the current-year level of $54,496. Undergraduate financial aid will be budgeted at $182 million, a $10-million (5.8 percent) increase from spending in the current academic year.

The term bill increased 3.8 percent from 2009-2010 to 2010-2011, and a like percentage in the subsequent year, and 3.5 percent from 2011-2012 to the current year. (Historical data on the College term bill are reported here.)

Among peer institutions that have disclosed their charges and aid budgets, Penn announced a 3.9 percent increase in the undergraduate term bill, to $58,812, and a 5 percent increase in financial aid, to $188 million. Yale will charge $57,500, up 4 percent from the current year, and projects $119 million for undergraduate financial aid, unchanged from the current-year level.

Read the news release here.

 

 

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