Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898 | SUBSCRIBE

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

John Harvard's Journal

Yesterday’s News

From the pages of the Harvard Alumni Bulletin and Harvard Magazine

September-October 2021

Illustration showing how Harvard Business School settled on its new name in 1961

Illustration by Mark Steele


Illustration by Mark Steele

1921

Barracks and stables are under construction on Soldiers Field to house 20 enlisted men and 85 horses for the department of military science.

1946

As of October 1, a total of 12,183 students have registered for fall term—a third larger than the previous peak—with final business and law school figures yet to come. Housing, especially for the 3,300 married veterans, is a major problem. Among the 5,419 undergraduates, there are 3,858 veterans.

1951

The weekly board fee for undergraduates reaches $14, prompting talks of limiting servings in the dining halls.

1956

Martha May Eliot’s appointment as professor and head of the department of maternal and child health in the Faculty of Public Health makes her Harvard’s third female full professor.

1961

Among alterations proposed for the Harvard School of Business Administration after a two-year study initiated by its dean is a change of name. The Bulletin reports “a widespread feeling” that the present name “does not imply an institution of professional stature, and that there should be…a Harvard Business School.”

1966

Creation of the Institute of Politics—at the renamed John F. Kennedy School of Government—is officially announced at a dinner on October 17, held in the newly completed Holyoke Center and attended by eight members of the Kennedy family.

1971

The Harvard class of ’75 includes the sons of the presidents of Columbia and Yale.

2006

The new Harvard College Women’s Center opens in Canaday Hall, culminating “the efforts of our students for 35 years,” notes dean of the College Benedict Gross. People “had to be pushy as well as smart to make this happen,” adds 300th Anniversary University Professor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich.

 

You Might Also Like:

Photograph of a pet hamster, dyed Yale blue, for a humor piece about Yale admissions

Photograph by iStock

Memorable Mentors

Painting: Carnations, Gillyvors, Willow

(1) Carnations. (2) Gillyvors. 
Perdita: The fairest flower o' the season
Are our Carnations and streaked Gillyvors, 
Which some call Nature's bastards 
Winter's Tale, Act IV, sc. 4 

(3) Willow. 
Queen: There is a Willow grows aslant a brook, 
That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream. 
There on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clamoring to hang, an envious sliver broke. 
Hamlet, Act IV, sc. 7 

Artwork by Rosa M. Towne and photograph by Edward Tabor 

The Paintings Found Behind a Shelf of Books in the Harvard Botanical Museum

A humorous illustration of women trying to buy football tickets in 1921

Illustration by Mark Steele

Yesterday’s News

You Might Also Like:

Photograph of a pet hamster, dyed Yale blue, for a humor piece about Yale admissions

Photograph by iStock

Memorable Mentors

Painting: Carnations, Gillyvors, Willow

(1) Carnations. (2) Gillyvors. 
Perdita: The fairest flower o' the season
Are our Carnations and streaked Gillyvors, 
Which some call Nature's bastards 
Winter's Tale, Act IV, sc. 4 

(3) Willow. 
Queen: There is a Willow grows aslant a brook, 
That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream. 
There on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clamoring to hang, an envious sliver broke. 
Hamlet, Act IV, sc. 7 

Artwork by Rosa M. Towne and photograph by Edward Tabor 

The Paintings Found Behind a Shelf of Books in the Harvard Botanical Museum

A humorous illustration of women trying to buy football tickets in 1921

Illustration by Mark Steele

Yesterday’s News