Harvard by the Numbers

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) faces interesting challenges in maintaining expertise in current fields of knowledge, bringing in professors to pursue new frontiers, training future scholars, and educating undergraduates. As FAS dean Michael D. Smith illustrated with these figures, adapted from his annual report dated May 2008, social sciences (economics, government, history, and so on) attract the largest number of College concentrators, and account for the largest faculty cohort. Arts and humanities professors rank second, but the number of concentrators (not the only students taking courses, to be sure), is much smaller, and diminishing. Graduate-student enrollments (importantly, the source of teaching fellows) are largest in the sciences, but fastest-growing in engineering and applied sciences—the only group within the faculty to expand in relative size during the past decade (see “A ‘Pause’ and Progress in FAS,” July-August, page 68).

You might also like

“Edifying and Beautiful”

Botanical illustrations on display at Harvard’s rare book library

Sarah Ganz Blythe New Art Museums Director

Assumes Harvard post in August

Taking Climate Action at Harvard

Focusing on prime polluting industries, plus politics and policy

Most popular

Crimson En Garde

Eight Olympics-bound Harvard fencers

Taking Climate Action at Harvard

Focusing on prime polluting industries, plus politics and policy

Sarah Ganz Blythe New Art Museums Director

Assumes Harvard post in August

More to explore

Architect Kimberly Dowell is Changing Her Profession

Kimberly Dowdell influences her profession—and the built environment.

Harvard Professor on Printmaking

An art historian analyzes an overlooked medium.

Dream Renovations to Harvard Yard Libraries

An ambitious plan for the next century of learning