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John Harvard's Journal

Deconstructionism

September-October 2010

The view on Prescott Street, east of the Fogg, following demolition of Werner Otto Hall

The view on Prescott Street, east of the Fogg, following demolition of Werner Otto Hall

Photograph by Jim Harrison

Looking north, toward William James Hall

Looking north, toward William James Hall

Photograph by Jim Harrison

The Fogg's main entrance, on Quincy Street

The Fogg's main entrance, on Quincy Street

Photograph by Jim Harrison

Interior demolition of the Fogg Art Museum proceeded during the early summer, leaving carefully sorted rubble ready for recycling, like the artfully arrayed metal at left. As the 1991 Werner Otto Hall (former home to the Busch-Reisinger Museum and Fine Arts Library) was razed, previously connected windows and passageways were shored up (and that doorway on the upper left of the Fogg structure became a dysfunctional exit). Decorative stonework was removed piece by piece and stored off-site, for later restoration.

Thereafter, the construction crews began preparing to excavate around the existing building—a delicate matter as the Fogg itself (shown above, along its Quincy Street entrance) and the sweeping Prescott Street ramp from Le Corbusier’s Carpenter Center had to be shored up and protected from damage by heavy equipment. New subsurface spaces and a Prescott Street entrance will emerge in the reconfigured museum complex, scheduled for completion in 2013. Regular photographic updates of the work in progress are available at harvardmag.com/sidewalk-superintendent.

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Source: Massachusetts Racial Disparity Report

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You Might Also Like:

hotograph of demonstrators in front of the federal courthouse in Boston where the SFFA v. Harvard trial took place, with signs reading "Harvard No More Racial Stereotyping" and "My Race Should Not Hurt Me In Admissions.

In October 2018, supporters of Students for Fair Admissions hold signs in front of the federal courthouse where the admissions trial took place.

Photograph by Alamy Images

Admissions Lawsuit, Round Two

Loeb House, where the University’s governing boards convene
Photograph by Harvard Magazine/JC

Harvard Governing Boards Change Overseers

According to the data set assembled by Harvard Law School scholars, black and Latinx people are overrepresented in Massachusetts criminal caseload compared to their population in the state. White people make up 74.3 percent of the state’s population and are defendants in in 58.7 percent of cases. Black people make up 6.5 percent of the population and are defendants in 17.1 percent of cases. Latinx people make up 8.7 percent of the population, and are defendants in in 18.3 percent of cases. Click on image to view full graphic

Source: Massachusetts Racial Disparity Report

A Major Disparity in Massachusetts Criminal Justice