Chapter & Verse

Correspondence on not-so-famous lost words

Lewis Klebanoff seeks a poem, possibly titled “Together,” describing a married couple aging together, in their living room, the husband reading, the wife knitting. “As I recall, they didn’t speak, but the poem dealt with the depth of their communication and relationship.”

Bob Tieger asks whether “more brio than class” has a literary origin, and if so, who said it about what or whom.

“I’m a city boy myself” (May-June). Daniel Rosenberg and David Goldber were the first to identify the conclusion of Saul Bellow’s Humboldt’s Gift.

Send inquiries and answers to “Chapter and Verse,” Harvard Magazine, 7 Ware Street, Cambridge 02138, or via e-mail to chapterandverse@harvardmag.com.

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