Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898 | SUBSCRIBE

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

John Harvard's Journal

Dunster Deconstruction

September-October 2014


Photograph by Harvard Magazine/JC


Photograph by Harvard Magazine/JC

Having practiced the art and craft of House renewal on parts of Quincy and Leverett houses, the College is now renovating an entire undergraduate residence. As soon as students decamped, the scaffolding went up, construction workers began stripping the roof and removing obsolete interior fixtures, and the courtyard was converted into a staging area for heavy equipment and building materials: the grass gave way to gravel and the iron gate facing the Charles River was removed for safekeeping (with the supporting towers protectively boxed). After a year-long diaspora—in part in the repurposed Inn at Harvard, which will have a swing-space dining hall—students should move back into their remade quarters in time for classes in September 2015.

You Might Also Like:

Photograph of the world's first net-zero Victorian passive house

The world's first Victorian passive house, at 60 Stearns Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Photograph by Kristina DeMichele/Harvard Magazine

A Net-Zero-Energy Victorian Home Makes History

The “Rocking Horse Graveyard,” in Lincoln, Massachusetts

Click on arrow at right to view full image gallery
(1 of 8) The “Rocking Horse Graveyard,” in Lincoln, Massachusetts— “It’s a fun, whimsical thing with a flea- market feel,” Ocker says. “But at night it’s one of the creepiest sights on the planet.”
Photograph courtesy of J.W. Ocker/OTIS

New England’s Oddities

You Might Also Like:

Photograph of the world's first net-zero Victorian passive house

The world's first Victorian passive house, at 60 Stearns Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Photograph by Kristina DeMichele/Harvard Magazine

A Net-Zero-Energy Victorian Home Makes History

The “Rocking Horse Graveyard,” in Lincoln, Massachusetts

Click on arrow at right to view full image gallery
(1 of 8) The “Rocking Horse Graveyard,” in Lincoln, Massachusetts— “It’s a fun, whimsical thing with a flea- market feel,” Ocker says. “But at night it’s one of the creepiest sights on the planet.”
Photograph courtesy of J.W. Ocker/OTIS

New England’s Oddities