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John Harvard's Journal

Printer’s Mark

March-April 2013

1924

1924

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1925 and 1940

1925 and 1940

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1931

1931

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1931 and 1932

1931 and 1932

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1935

1935

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1936

1936

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1938

1938

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1949

1949

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1950

1950

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1960

1960

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

New logo

New logo

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

New logo on book spine

New logo on book spine

Courtesy of Harvard University Press and Chermayeff & Geismar

Shielded Identity

For a hundred years, Harvard University Press appears to have had no logo it could call its own. When a designer fashioned a title page for a book, or stamping for its spine, or a catalog of forthcoming books, or a flyer promoting them, he or she appears to have turned to the type-specimen book of the Printing Office (the office itself closed in 2002) and used one of scores of Harvard shields found there. Sometimes indecision seized the designer, and one shield appeared on the spine and a different one on the title page. Shown here is a small sampling of the shields that have adorned Press publications. Sometime in the mid 1970s, the use of shields became infrequent, and a simple "Harvard" appeared on book spines, in this typeface or that. 

To help mark its centennial, the Press has adopted a new, cohesive visual identity. The logo takes the form of two vertical rows of three crimson rectangles, with the letter H visible in the negative space between the six rectangles. Sagi Haviv, partner at the design firm Chermayeff & Geismar, which worked with the Press to create the new look, said that it will be well suited for a variety of uses: "The new identity is simple enough that it will be effective both in traditional applications, such as book spines and title pages, and also in digital media such as app icons, browser icons, and e-books."

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You Might Also Like:

A spoof passport written in Spanglish for the fictional country El Spirit Republic of Puerto Rico, with a domino in place of a national seal on its cover

Click on arrow at right to see full image gallery
(1 of 12) Adál Maldonado’s The Passport, 1995, from the series The Spirit Republic of Puerto Rico.

Transfer from the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University, Gift of the artist, 2012.178. © ADзL. Image courtesy of Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum

Harvard Art Museums exhibit displays the ubiquity of cross-border movement

Click on arrow at right to see full image

Russian ballerina Lubov Tchernicheva, 1920 production of Cleopatra 
Russian ballerina Lubov Tchernicheva in Cleopatra, 1920. © E.O. Hoppé Estate Collection/Curatorial Assistance Inc.

Images from the Ballets Russes

A street crowd of black men and women, all dressed in white, either playing or responding to the playing of dozens of trombones

Click on arrow at right to see full image gallery

(1 of 3) “God’s Trombones, Harlem,” 2009

Photograph by Frank Stewart/Courtesy of the Cooper Gallery of African and African American Art

Frank Stewart’s jazz photography