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John Harvard's Journal

Yesterday’s News

Headlines from Harvard’s history

November-December 2021

A humorous illustration of women trying to buy football tickets in 1921

Illustration by Mark Steele


Illustration by Mark Steele

1921

Thirteen women, students at the School of Education, apply for tickets to the Yale Game. The Bulletin reports that three ticket clerks “whose temperaments are especially nervous have followed the advice of their physicians by resigning.”

1936

Historian Samuel Eliot Morison reports that the package sealed by President Josiah Quincy in 1836 and opened by President Conant during the Tercentenary hoopla contains 440 manuscripts, mostly replies from graduates invited to the bicentennial dinner (at $1.50 a head).

1941

Two freshmen enliven hour-exam period with a Crimson classified: “Wanted—Information where one may obtain a human corpse in reasonable condition.” The 42 phone calls in response range from students wishing to be embalmed after hourlies to funeral directors, the police department, and the morgue. The Yardlings plead simple curiosity as their impetus.

1961

A faculty committee explores what action, if any, the University should take (in light of local, state, and federal policies) to deal with possible danger from fire or fallout in the event of a nuclear attack.

1986

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences votes to establish an honors concentration in the field of women’s studies. The lone dissenter, professor of government Harvey Mansfield, calls the new program a “foolish and almost pitiful surrender to feminism.”

1991

Over 15 percent of the 1,608 seniors intend to pursue careers in teaching, research, or administration at the college or university level.

2001

The Crimson’s digital archive goes live online and gives readers access to articles as far back as the 1950s.

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Photograph of a pet hamster, dyed Yale blue, for a humor piece about Yale admissions

Photograph by iStock

Memorable Mentors

Painting: Carnations, Gillyvors, Willow

(1) Carnations. (2) Gillyvors. 
Perdita: The fairest flower o' the season
Are our Carnations and streaked Gillyvors, 
Which some call Nature's bastards 
Winter's Tale, Act IV, sc. 4 

(3) Willow. 
Queen: There is a Willow grows aslant a brook, 
That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream. 
There on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clamoring to hang, an envious sliver broke. 
Hamlet, Act IV, sc. 7 

Artwork by Rosa M. Towne and photograph by Edward Tabor 

The Paintings Found Behind a Shelf of Books in the Harvard Botanical Museum

Drawing of Poco from Harvard Celebrities: A Book of Caricatures and Decorative Drawings, 1901

Click on arrow to view full image

From Harvard Celebrities: A Book of Caricatures and Decorative Drawings, 1901

The Poco of Pocos

You Might Also Like:

Photograph of a pet hamster, dyed Yale blue, for a humor piece about Yale admissions

Photograph by iStock

Memorable Mentors

Painting: Carnations, Gillyvors, Willow

(1) Carnations. (2) Gillyvors. 
Perdita: The fairest flower o' the season
Are our Carnations and streaked Gillyvors, 
Which some call Nature's bastards 
Winter's Tale, Act IV, sc. 4 

(3) Willow. 
Queen: There is a Willow grows aslant a brook, 
That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream. 
There on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clamoring to hang, an envious sliver broke. 
Hamlet, Act IV, sc. 7 

Artwork by Rosa M. Towne and photograph by Edward Tabor 

The Paintings Found Behind a Shelf of Books in the Harvard Botanical Museum

Drawing of Poco from Harvard Celebrities: A Book of Caricatures and Decorative Drawings, 1901

Click on arrow to view full image

From Harvard Celebrities: A Book of Caricatures and Decorative Drawings, 1901

The Poco of Pocos