Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898 | SUBSCRIBE

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Explorations and Curiosities

Bedding Down in Early America

January-February 2019

A miniature version of a New England high-post bed (ca. 1750-1765), with historically accurate bed furnishings by Natalie Larson

Object on loan courtesy of Natalie and Bruce Larson

Photograph courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art


A miniature version of a New England high-post bed (ca. 1750-1765), with historically accurate bed furnishings by Natalie Larson

Object on loan courtesy of Natalie and Bruce Larson

Photograph courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

Visitors at the Wadsworth Atheneum admire a coverlet (ca. 1780)—also known as a “counterpane”—with impressive appliqué craftsmanship.

Photograph courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art


Visitors at the Wadsworth Atheneum admire a coverlet (ca. 1780)—also known as a “counterpane”—with impressive appliqué craftsmanship.

Photograph courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

A Star of Bethlehem quilt (1842), made by Submit Gay, of Hartford.

A gift from Miss Fanny Gay Darrow. (1926.2904)

Photograph courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art


A Star of Bethlehem quilt (1842), made by Submit Gay, of Hartford.

A gift from Miss Fanny Gay Darrow. (1926.2904)

Photograph courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

A good night’s sleep was likely hard to come by in early American homes. Privacy was rare—any beds were located in common spaces—and only householders with seniority got one; children, servants, and guests were treated to pallets, or bare floors. Rope-strung supports tightened with a wooden peg (from which the phrase “sleep tight” derives) held mattresses stuffed with horsehair, straw, wool, and moss—or, at best, with goose feathers. Curtains mitigated cold winter drafts and helped shelter sleepers (or those engaged in other, personal nighttime activities). Beds and linens were labor-intensive to produce, or extremely expensive to buy. As “Bed Furnishings in Early America: An Intimate Look”—at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, in Hartford, Connecticut, further reveals: “Before the mid-twentieth century, a clean, comfortable bed was a luxury.”

Open through January 27, the show highlights textiles and furniture from the seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries. An “English bed furnishing set” from 1650-1700, which was transported to America, features an enclosure made of fustian valances and curtains embroidered with crewel yarn in a flamboyant vine-and-flower pattern. A miniature, scaled version of a New England high-post bed (ca. 1750-1765) features historically accurate red-gingham bed furnishings (above) made by Natalie Larson, an expert on historic textiles and reproductions based in Williamsburg, Virginia. Other exceptional handwork, which took artisans and homemakers countless hours to complete, is also on display in bed hangings and rugs, coverlets, and quilts.

 All told, the exhibit concludes that despite the bed’s central role in reproduction, birthing, sickness, and death, holding apart “a space for comfort, warmth, and security” was largely a status symbol reflecting a homeowner’s financial standing and specific physical and emotional needs.

Harvard Squared

A guide to the arts and culture, history, cuisine, and natural beauty of Cambridge, Boston, and beyond

You Might Also Like:

painting of twins asleep on a NYC subway, nestled against their caregiver

Twins (Subway), 2018, by Jordan Casteel

Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York. © Jordan Casteel

Curiosities: The Art of Childhood

glass and steel addition to a traditional brick building that houses the Mattatuck Museum

The Mattatuck Museum, newly renovated, offers a more welcoming entrance to visitors 

Photograph courtesy of the Mattatuck Museum

Downtown Oasis

Wisteria in Pebble Garden at Dumbarton Oaks

Wisteria in Pebble Garden at Dumbarton Oaks

Photograph courtesy of Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

From the Soil Up

You Might Also Like:

painting of twins asleep on a NYC subway, nestled against their caregiver

Twins (Subway), 2018, by Jordan Casteel

Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York. © Jordan Casteel

Curiosities: The Art of Childhood

glass and steel addition to a traditional brick building that houses the Mattatuck Museum

The Mattatuck Museum, newly renovated, offers a more welcoming entrance to visitors 

Photograph courtesy of the Mattatuck Museum

Downtown Oasis

Wisteria in Pebble Garden at Dumbarton Oaks

Wisteria in Pebble Garden at Dumbarton Oaks

Photograph courtesy of Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

From the Soil Up